Artist Statement:


Life on a less than a dollar bill chronicles northeastern Nigeria; from the out-of-school child-beggar (Almajiri) playing on the streets, to their peers enrolled in public schools - where fees are N50 (less $1) with their parents unable to afford. These kids are later withdrawn from school to pursue street-hawking to fend for their families. The narrative spirals to the Internally Displaced Persons fleeing for safety, struggling to survive in camps having lost their means of livelihood as a result of the ongoing insurgency.

Having escaped the conflict theatre, a bigger conflict is set in their hearts about the cause of their predicaments. The Muslims question the legitimacy of the religious war the insurgents claim to be waging, while the educated ones among them question Boko Haram's (translated western education is forbidden) use of foreign artilleries like grenades and guns to cause havoc in their local communities. Life on a one dollar bill chronicles these stories of Nigerians who surviving the chaos and hardship, bear the hope of a better tomorrow which seems lost.

Almajiri: Two child-beggars engage in a playdate dropping aside their begging bowls on a weekday.

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Rescued internally displaced persons, still shaken after arriving Malkohi camp.


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IDPs who had just arrived at Damare Camp 

waiting with their personal belongings to be registered.

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N50 School: A government-approved neighborhood school fees where children pay N50.00 (less than a dollar) for education. Some parents cannot still afford to pay the token fee.

Yola, 2015.

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50 Naira School: A government-approved neighborhood school fees where children pay N50.00 (less than a dollar) for education. Some parents cannot still afford to pay the token fee.

Yola, 2015.

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N50 School:  A government-approved neighborhood school fees where children pay N50.00 (less than a dollar) for education. Some parents cannot still afford to pay the token fee.

Yola, 2015.

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